Connect with us

Community DMV

Abiy Ahmed Meets the Ethiopian Diaspora

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

Last Saturday afternoon, the streets of Washington, D.C. were a sprawling symphony of green, yellow, and red. The flags of Ethiopia and Eritrea flew from car windows, tri-color banners hung from apartment railings, and peace ribbons adorned the facades of local businesses. Trucks and cars bearing messages of unity stationed themselves outside the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, drawing crowds of eager amateur photographers looking to document an occasion most never expected to see within their lifetimes.

The Washington metro area has long boasted a large East African immigrant community, but Saturday saw a staggering influx of Ethiopians (and some Eritreans) from around the country. Hailing from states as far Ohio, California, and Georgia, they all gathered in D.C. for one purpose: to hear Dr. Abiy Ahmed, the new Ethiopian prime minister, address the diaspora. To medemer, as Ahmed’s office titled the invitation, an Amharic word meaning “to come together”—or, more literally, “to be added to one another.”

Appointed after the surprise resignation of former P.M. Hailemariam Desalegn, Ahmed inherited a deeply fractured country when he was sworn in this April. In recent years, a wave of protests over urban expansion in Ethiopia’s Southern regions had been met with disproportionate violence from the state. Journalists and political dissidents had been jailed or disappeared. Border tensions with neighboring Eritrea, which was annexed by Emperor Haile Selassie in the 1960s, had remained a constant source of anxiety for residents of both countries. But Ahmed began his tenure with a series of radical, nearly unimaginable reforms: ending the state of emergency that the prior regime imposed in response to widespread protest, freeing political prisoners, and most notably, extending an invitation of peace to Eritrean president Isaias Afwerki and establishing diplomatic ties between the two countries in the process. In doing so, the 41-year-old Ahmed, whom many have compared to former U.S. President Barack Obama, has inspired a rare, renewed sense of national hope in Ethiopians—and relief in Eritreans—around the world.

Read more @ The Atlantic

Leave your vote

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Community DMV

AUGUST 25, 2018. GIRL SCOUTS EMPOWERMENT SYMPOSIUM/COLLEGE FAIR!

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

INFO @ https://marchforcollege.regfox.com/girl-scouts-of-central-md-empowerment-symposium-march-for-college

Continue Reading

Community DMV

EQUITY & Renewable Energy!

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

Let’s not let “equity” become another meaningless buzzword for the city government! Join us to explore equity and renewable energy!   
 
Empower DC is a citywide membership based organization committed to racial, economic and environmental justice.
Join as a member and help Empower DC
Organize Community Power!

Continue Reading

Community DMV

Pepco is building a substation next to a school. Residents want to know: Why here?

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

Nestled between a public school and affordable housing for seniors and families lies a bustling community garden. Schoolchildren learn how to grow food. Seniors pick up bundles of fresh veggies on the cheap. And some of the District’s most acclaimed chefs purchase herbs and edible flowers grown here.

But the K Street Farm is living on Pepco-owned land, and the utility is preparing to bring a $143 million electrical substation to the property in Washington’s Mount Vernon Triangle neighborhood. Community activists are attempting to thwart the plans, saying an industrial facility does not belong so close to a school.

Pepco — the utility company that provides electricity to the District — is proposing to build the substation on the 100 block of K Street NW, a reflection of growing power needs there and in other gentrifying neighborhoods with booming populations, including Shaw and NoMa.

The project has been in the works for about three years, and a small group of parents, churchgoers and neighborhood residents organized protests last week, saying the proposed substation represents the latest example of the city catering to new, wealthier residents at the expense of longtime Washingtonians. The Walker-Jones Education Campus, which is separated from the Pepco property by a parking lot and street, serves children who mostly come from low-income families.

“I don’t think anyone could doubt that the city tends to put these things next to communities they feel have less ability to fight and be heard,” said Parisa Norouzi, executive director of Empower DC, a local advocacy group.

The two-acre-plus parcel was city property until 2015. But Mayor Muriel E. Bowser transferred it to Pepco as part of a huge land swap so that the city could acquire property needed for a soccer stadium at Buzzard Point in Southwest Washington, now D.C. United’s Audi Field.

Read more by Perry Stein @ The Washington Post HERE

Continue Reading
Fiverr

Features & Brands

Trending

Hey there!

Forgot password?

Forgot your password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Close
of

Processing files…