Connect with us

DMV History & Culture

Don’t Forget Josh Gibson

Jae Alan

Published

on

Community DMV

Help Celebrate the Spirit of Black History Month Every Day :: Support The National Museum of African American History and Culture

Jae Alan

Published

on

Continue Reading

Community DMV

10 notable D.C. projects designed by black architects

Jae Alan

Published

on

In the architecture field, African Americans are underrepresented with progress on diversifying the field remaining slow. While African Americans made up 13 percent of the total U.S. population in 2010only 2 percent of licensed architects in the U.S. are African American. Despite this, black architects have always had a huge impact on the nation’s capital.

Below, Curbed DC has compiled a list of buildings, parks, public art, and libraries in the District, each designed by notable black architects, such as Michael Marshall and John Anderson Lankford.

Note: The mapped points have been ordered geographically, from the most north to the most south.r

Read full story HERE

Continue Reading

Community DMV

How One Amateur Historian Brought Us the Stories of African-Americans Who Knew Abraham Lincoln

Jae Alan

Published

on

The memoir of Elizabeth Keckly, a formerly enslaved woman who became a dressmaker to First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln, struck a nerve when it was published in 1868. Behind the Scenes, or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House was an unprecedented look at the Lincolns’ lives in the White House, but reviewers widely condemned its author for divulging personal aspects of their story, particularly the fragile emotional state of Mary Lincoln after her husband’s murder.

For decades after its publication, the book was difficult to find, and Keckly lived in relative obscurity. In black Washington, however, many African-Americans personally knew and admired her, and remained a beloved figure.

When journalist and Democratic political operative David Rankin Barbee claimed in 1935 that Keckly had not written the book and, remarkably, had never existed, one determined Washingtonian, an African-American high school teacher named John E. Washington, felt compelled to speak up. The encounter with Barbee about Keckly and Behind the Scenes changed Washington’s life and led him to write a remarkable book of his own—They Knew Lincoln.

Part memoir, part history, part argument for the historical significance of common people, They Knew Lincoln was the first book to focus exclusively on Lincoln’s relationship to African-Americans.  They Knew Lincoln not only affirmed the existence of Keckly, but revealed that African-Americans, from the obscure folk preacher known as Uncle Ben to the much more prominent Keckly, had shaped Lincoln’s life, and it insisted that their stories were worth knowing.

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/how-one-amateur-historian-brought-us-stories-african-americans-who-knew-abraham-lincoln-180968215/#AeuleTy5Uo0VqGRU.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Continue Reading

Subscribe

Enter your email to receive Urban Marketing USA updates.



Our Brands

Trending

Hey there!

Forgot password?

Don't have an account? Register

Forgot your password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Close
of

Processing files…