Connect with us

News & Features

Google Just Granted $1 Million to Increase Black Male Presence in Tech

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

Google is providing a $1 million grant to the Hidden Genius Project—an Oakland-based organization dedicated to increasing the representation of black male youths in technology. The grant is provided through Google’s foundation arm, Google.org.

Read more @ Black Enterprise

Leave your vote

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

History & Culture

Documenting ‘Slavery by Another Name’ in Texas

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

Americans who grew up with the fiction that slavery was confined to the South — and that the North had always been “free” — learned differently in 1991, when construction workers stumbled upon the skeletal remains of more than 400 Africans at a site in New York City that has since been designated the African Burial Ground National Monument. The catalog of injuries etched into the bones of the men and women who labored to build, feed and protect Colonial-era New York includes muscles so violently strained they were ripped away from the skeleton, offering a grisly portrait of what it was like to be worked to death in bondage.

A similar portrait is emerging in Sugar Land, Tex., a suburb southwest of Houston, where researchers are examining the remains of about 95African-Americans whose unmarked graves were discovered this year.The dead are almost certainly victims of the second system of slavery that arose when Southerners set out to circumvent the 13th Amendment of 1865, which outlawed involuntary servitude except as punishment for criminal conviction.

Read more @ The New York Times

Continue Reading

Anacostia Events

Review: ‘Happy Ending’ at Anacostia Playhouse

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

Happy Ending is a one-act satirical comedy written in the 1960s by Douglas Turner Ward, co-founder of the Negro Ensemble Company. He had written an op-ed for the New York Times called “American Theatre: for Whites Only?” that prompted funding and other support for the new company. The NEC’s mission was to create theater by black playwrights from the black point of view primarily (not exclusively) for black audiences. It’s easy to forget what a radical notion about representation that was back then. For that memorial reason alone, the revival of Happy Ending just opened at Anacostia Playhouse is well worthy of attention.

But do not come expecting a museum piece—because this Happy Ending is fresh, funny, and bursting with song-and-dance pizzazz. Yes, song and dance! Director Ella Davis has juiced up this modern classic with a riot of musical numbers. Some of the tunes that embellish the zany storyline are familiar (“What a difference a day makes”); more are brand-new. As composed by Marion Johnson and performed by a spirited cast with big voices, they get the joint jumping. And by the time of the show’s happy ending (no spoiler: the title gives it away), Ward’s comic gem has jumped out of history into the hysterical present.

Read more at DC Metro Theatre Arts

Continue Reading

Business News

5 Reasons Why Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Are Essential in the Cannabis Industry Business

Urban Marketing Group Staff

Published

on

The cannabis sector is one of America’s fastest growing industries. Thirty states have passed medical marijuana laws, and nine of those allow adult use. Nearly two-thirds of Americans support legalization. Despite the influx of consumer interest and cash, people of color are increasingly being left out of the green rush.

American attitudes about cannabis have transformed in a generation, yet echoes of the nation’s failed War on Drugs, implemented in the 1970s by President Richard Nixon and catapulted into a feverish storm during the Ronald Reagan Era, remain. Thiat federal call to action prompted all law enforcement to target people of color. Millions have been prosecuted and incarcerated, some with dubious connections to illegal drugs, particularly marijuana, which remains federally illegal. Meanwhile, minorities remained locked out of potentially the biggest economic boom of our lifetimes. According to a study done by Marijuana Business Daily, more than 80 percent of cannabis businesses are owned by whites, compared to that of less than 5 percent of African Americans and less than 6 percent Hispanic.

Read more by Dasheeda Dawson at Entrpreneur HERE

Continue Reading

Features & Brands

Trending

Hey there!

Forgot password?

Forgot your password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Close
of

Processing files…