Connect with us

Entrepreneurship

Are You a Leader With High Potential? You Are if You Answer ‘Yes’ to These 6 Questions

Published

on

Spread the love

There may be nothing more important to an organization than spotting and nourishing high-potential leaders–the ripple effect on an organization of having such leaders in place is irrefutable.

But how do you know if you’re one of those high-potential leaders?

I spent 25 years at leadership development powerhouse Procter & Gamble, known for being the company that produces more CEOs (by a long shot) than any other company. P&G has its own view of what constitutes the highest-potential leaders, so I blend that knowledge with my own experience being on the front lines of leadership at P&G and from leading recruiting teams to identify top talent.

So consider what follows a checklist to help you see where you stand or to know what to look for when hiring or seeking to promote future leaders. How many of these garner an emphatic “Yes”?

1. “I’m quick to learn, quicker to adapt.”

There’s a definite correlation between those who learn the fastest and those hungry to learn fast. Yes, having a solid microprocessor upstairs helps, but anyone can bring a desire to learn to the table.

From there, it’s the energy for and ability to pay attention to your surroundings, your competition, your boss, and your co-workers, and to pick up on cues of what to do and what to act on. It also means learning quickly from your mistakes and not repeating them.

Along with learning comes adapting. The highest-potential leaders can turn on a dime when faced with new data or changing circumstances.

2. “I’m wired for winning, intent on improving.”

Meaning, if you aren’t winning, it almost hurts. You have a visible passion to beat competitors and crush goals that rubs off on everyone around you (without rubbing them the wrong way).

At the same time, you realize winning isn’t static, it requires you doing your part to keep improving. Of all the traits that stuck out to me in interviews with high-potential candidates, the continual improvement mentality was among the most telling. It’s almost a precursor for high-potential leaders; how can you be high-potential if you’re not hungry to maximize your own potential?

3. “I’m a boss at influencing the boss.”

The ability to lead the boss’s thinking–and any stakeholder’s for that matter–is a key hallmark of rising star leaders. And the very best don’t use their position’s power or politics to effectively and efficiently influence those around them. They understand when to use data versus gut, and when to employ EQ to get emotions working to their favor (without being manipulative).  

4. “I have a powerful personal presence.”

Read full article By Scott MautzKeynote speaker and author, ‘Find the Fire’ and ‘Make It Matter’@scott_mautz here @ Inc.com

Leave your vote

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Entrepreneurship

How Entrepreneurs Are Connecting the World With IoT

Avatar

Published

on

By

Spread the love

Some have dubbed the Internet of Things, or IoT, the “Intelligence of Things,” and even the “Internet of Everything.” Whatever they call it, there is no doubt that IoT has been steadily emerging and shaping our future. Put simply, IoT eliminates the need for human interaction with other humans or computers to transfer data. 

IoT already has numerous uses — smart homes, connected cars and smart retail to name a few — and it is expected to have an even larger impact on our lives in the future. Gartner reports that in the year 2017, there were more than eight billion IoT-connected devices in the world, while in 2018, that figure surpassed nine billion. It is expected that in 2020, IoT-connected devices worldwide will close to 21 billion.

Read full story @ Entrepreneuer here >>> https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/341451

Continue Reading

Entrepreneurship

The 6 Best Books of the Year for Entrepreneurs (They Make Great Gifts, Too)

Avatar

Published

on

By

Spread the love

I read about 75 nonfiction books a year. As an author of nine of my own books, I must stay current on what the greatest minds in business are thinking. When a title really sparks my imagination, I contact the authors directly. But I only write about books that teach me something new.

Each of these books taught me something new. I’m sure they’ll inspire you, too. The hardcovers also make great gifts for the entrepreneur on your holiday list.

1. Edison by Edmund Morris

Thomas Edison didn’t just invent the light bulb. He averaged one patent for every 10 to 12 days of his adult life. Edison is the last book written by Morris, a Pulitzer Prize winning biographer who died in May. The book runs close to 800 pages (and gets very technical in places), but it’s a great read for inventors, scientists, and anyone who has a keen interest in the hard sciences and the history of inventions. 

The passages in which Morris describes what it was like to listen to recorded sound for the first time (Edison invented the phonograph) or to see a world illuminated by electric light are reminders of why entrepreneurs do what they do. Light bulbs were “globes of glass that gave off no fumes and sooted no ceilings.” When people heard the phonograph, a “miraculous machine” that recorded and played back a human voice, most couldn’t believe it. “Since the dawn of humanity … the human voice was a product of the body and therefore must die too … but here now were echoes made hard, resounding as often as anyone wanted to hear them again.”

If you choose to listen to the audio book of Edison, you know whom to thank for it.  

2. That Will Never Work by Marc Randolph

In That Will Never Work, Netflix’s co-founder tells the story of how Netflix went from concept to company–and how it nearly didn’t make it. It reads like a novel full of ups and downs, failures and successes.

One memorable story is the time Randolph and co-founder Reed Hastings (Netflix’s current CEO) pitched Blockbuster about a partnership. Netflix was making $5 million in revenue while Blockbuster was making $6 billion. Blockbuster executives laughed the founders out of the room–literally.

On the flight home, Hastings was exhausted, and the two men sat quietly. Randolph broke the silence with a line that became their rallying cry. Randolph said, “It looks like we’re going to have to kick their a**.” And so they did.

3. What You Do Is Who You Are by Ben Horowitz

Horowitz is co-founder of the legendary venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. The book is about how to create a business culture, one of the most important things any entrepreneur must do to sustain success. “Your culture is how your company makes decisions when you’re not there … it’s how they [your employees] behave when no one is looking.”

What You Do Is Who You Are is not just a culture book. It’s one of the most intriguing history books I’ve read in the business category. You’ll learn about slave rebellions, the samurai warriors who ruled Japan for 700 years, Genghis Khan, who built the world’s largest empire, and other stories you’re unlikely to find in a standard business book.

According to Horowitz, “Companies–just like gangs, armies, and nations–are large organizations that rise or fall because of the daily microbehaviors of the human beings that compose them.”

Read full article @ Inc here >>> https://www.inc.com/carmine-gallo/the-6-best-books-of-year-for-entrepreneurs-they-make-great-gifts-too.html

Continue Reading

Entrepreneurship

Shaquille O’Neal Discusses Investing, Franchising, and Donuts | WSJ

Avatar

Published

on

By

Spread the love

Continue Reading

Trending

Hey there!

Forgot password?

Don't have an account? Register

Forgot your password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Close
of

    Processing files…