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Beyoncé, Serena Williams open up about potentially fatal childbirths, a problem especially for black mothers

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Beyoncé. Serena Williams. While one is a singer and the other is a professional tennis player, there are many similarities between the women’s lives. Both are at the top of their respective fields — Beyoncé has 22 Grammy Awards. Williams has 23 Grand Slam singles titles. Both are African American. Both are mothers.

But the women have shared one life experience that has recently attracted widespread attention: Both survived potentially fatal pregnancy complications.

On Monday, Beyoncé revealed in Vogue’s September issue that she delivered her twins, Rumi and Sir, in June last year by emergency Caesarean section after being bedridden for a month because of “toxemia,” a condition better known as preeclampsia. The complication causes high blood pressure and can damage organs such as the liver and kidneys, according to the Mayo Clinic. The only cure for preeclampsia is delivering the baby.

Read more by Allyson Chiu @ The Washington Post HERE

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Holistic Practitioner Desiree Arnold Presents “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit 2018” A Free Teleconference

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Trinidad – Desiree Arnold took it upon herself to consult female experts from around the world for their insight and advice about menopause and aging gracefully and the “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit” is the result of her efforts. A free online conference set to launch October 23rd through November 2nd, the “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit 2018” is available at www.womensmidliferevolutionsummit.com .

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Trinidad – With society continuing to place great emphasis on youthfulness, for many women, aging presents its own unique midlife crisis. Desiree Arnold understands firsthand the emotional and physical toil on women upon reaching their 40’s and beyond. A holistic practitioner, naturopath and the founder of Lifely Up, a web portal dedicated to menopausal transition, Arnold wanted to nurture women through a passage that she feels should be celebrated not vilified. She took it upon herself to consult female experts from around the world for their insight and advice and the “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit” is the result of her efforts. A free online conference set to launch October 23rd through November 2nd the “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit 2018” is available at www.womensmidliferevolutionsummit.com .
Shifting the perception of aging, midlife and menopausal transition from a negative outlook to an exciting journey is a rapidly emerging concept in this new day of women reclaiming their power. Older women in particular are garnering media attention for feats no longer just designated to a younger generation. The “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit 2018” presents a wonderful opportunity for women to learn, bond and share in the privacy of their homes as Arnold interviews 22 professionals, releasing two new interviews per day over a 11-day period. Female nutritionists, doctors, herbalists, holistic therapists, authors, life coaches, entrepreneurs, hormone experts, and physical trainers have all been gathered to lend credence to the joy of seasoned womanhood.
Desiree Arnold, founder of
 “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit”
“Living decades beyond midlife is still a newfangled phenomenon that many of us are now embracing. But for many of us, the thought of living beyond 50 for another 30, 40, or more years is shaded by fears of chronic disease, high medical bills and even living alone. Menopausal transition prepares the body, mind, and soul for that third stage in our lives where we actually can become masters of life as empresses and goddesses. The ‘Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit 2018’ presents the opportunity to take action now and learn to understand and treat ourselves in ways that favor long healthy meaningful years and decades, to which we can gracefully look forward to,” explains Arnold, who was born and grew up in Switzerland and has lived for the past 23 years on the island state of Trinidad and Tobago.
Some of the topics to be covered over the 11-day period include understanding of the physical, emotional, energetical and spiritual changes during midlife; how hormonal changes affect us; nutrition for the midlife cycle; preventing chronic disease; resurrection of the female archetype and inspiration and motivation to get moving with joy. Some of the professionals who weigh in with their wisdom include Dr. Judith Boice, ND, LAc, FABNO, naturopathic doctor, licensed acupuncturist, and Fellow of the American Board of Naturopathic Oncology; Jennifer Gibbons-Joseph, CPC, ELI-MP Managing Director of Conec Professional Life Coaching Services Ltd;
Susun Weed, author of the Wise Woman Herbal series and the voice of the Wise Woman Tradition; Meiling, the tour de force behind her premier Caribbean fashion house; Yvonne Heath, author of “Love Your Life to Death”; and Makeda Smith, veteran entertainment industry publicist and creator of the FlyingOver50 dance movement brand.
For registration to and information about “Women’s Midlife Revolution Summit 2018” go tohttps://womensmidliferevolutionsummit.com now!
NOTE TO MEDIA:  For interviews contact [email protected].

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Talking about mental health ‘taboo’ in African-American community: DC’s Taraji P Henson

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Taraji P opened up about stigma around and said discussing one’s well-being in the African-American community is looked upon as a “weakness” and “taboo”.

The “Empire” star said the people in her community are “demonised” for sharing their traumatic experiences.

“It was like looking for a unicorn, and the reason that happens is because we don’t talk about it in our community; it’s taboo, it’s looked upon as a weakness or we’re demonised for expressing rage for traumas we’ve been through.

“I have a lot of white friends and that’s what got me going. They say, ‘You don’t talk to anybody? Girl, I’m going to see my shrink every Thursday at 3 o’clock.’ So I was like why don’t we do that in our community?” told Variety.

The was speaking on the sidelines of the launch of The Boris Lawrence Foundation, her non-profit organisation, on Saturday.

Read more here

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Black Patients Miss Out On Promising Cancer Drugs

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It’s a promising new drug for multiple myeloma, one of the most savage blood cancers. Called Ninlaro, it can be taken as a pill, sparing patients painful injections or cumbersome IV treatments. In a video sponsored by the manufacturer, Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., one patient even hailed Ninlaro as “my savior.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved it in 2015 after patients in a clinical trial gained an average of six months without their cancer spreading. That trial, though, had a major shortcoming: its racial composition. One out of five people diagnosed with multiple myeloma in the U.S. is black, and African Americans are more than twice as likely as white Americans to be diagnosed with the blood cancer.

Yet of the 722 participants in the trial, only 13 — or 1.8 percent — were black.

The scarcity of black patients in Ninlaro’s testing left unanswered the vital question of whether the drug would work equally well for them. “Meaningful differences may exist” in how multiple myeloma affects black patients, what symptoms they experience and how they respond to medications, FDA scientists wrote in a 2017 journal article.

The racial disparity in the Ninlaro study isn’t unusual. Reflecting the reluctance of the FDA to force drugmakers to enroll more minority patients, and the failure of most manufacturers to do so voluntarily, stark under-representation of African Americans is widespread in clinical trials for cancer drugs, even when the type of cancer disproportionately affects them. A ProPublica analysis of data recently made public by the FDA found that in trials for 24 of the 31 cancer drugs approved since 2015, fewer than 5 percent of the patients were black. African-Americans make up 13.4 percent of the U.S. population.

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