Connect with us

RIP

Nick Ashford, Of Ashford & Simpson, Dies At 70

Published

on

Spread the love

Ashford-Simpson-640x384

NEW YORKNick Ashford, one-half of the legendary Motown songwriting duo Ashford & Simpson that penned elegant, soulful classics for the likes of Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye and funk hits for Chaka Khan and others, died Monday at age 70, his former publicist said.

Ashford, who along with wife Valerie Simpson wrote some of Motown’s biggest hits, died in a New York City hospital, said Liz Rosenberg, who was Ashford’s longtime friend. He had been suffering from throat cancer and had undergone radiation treatment, she told The Associated Press.

Though they had some of their greatest success at Motown with classics like “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” and “Reach Out And Touch Somebody’s Hand” by Ross and “You’re All I Need To Get By” by Gaye and Tammi Terrell, Ashford & Simpson also created anthems for others, like “I’m Every Woman” by Khan (and later remade by Whitney Houston).

“They had magic and that’s what creates those wonderful hits, that magic,” Verdine White of Earth, Wind and Fire said after learning of his friend’s death. “Without those songs, those artists wouldn’t have been able to go to the next level.”

Ashford & Simpson also had success writing for themselves: Perhaps the best-known song they sang was the 1980s hit “Solid As A Rock.”

Their relationship stretched more than four decades. They met in 1964 in a New York City church; Ashford, a South Carolina native, had come to the city to pursue a dance career. Simpson was a music student, and after connecting with her, they decided to start to write songs together.

“They were always comfortable with each other and they made all of us comfortable, because they were comfortable,” White said.

Read More…

Leave your vote

0 points
Upvote Downvote

Total votes: 0

Upvotes: 0

Upvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Downvotes: 0

Downvotes percentage: 0.000000%

Entertainment

CELEBS PAY RESPECTS … At Texas Funeral

Published

on

Spread the love

You can clearly tell just how much George H.W. Bush was liked and respected simply by the incredible number of celebs who turned out for the late President’s funeral in the Lone Star State.

Reba McEntire sang “The Lord’s Prayer” and The Oak Ridge Boys gave a powerful rendition of “Amazing Grace” during the funeral services Thursday at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Houston.

Read more @ TMZ

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Stan Lee, Marvel Comics visionary, dead at 95

Published

on

Spread the love

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Arthur Mitchell, Pioneering Black Ballet Dancer, Dies at 84

Published

on

Spread the love

Arthur Mitchell, who broke barriers for African-Americans in the 1950s as a ballet dancer with the New York City Ballet and who would go on to become a driving force in the creation of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, has died.

NEW YORK (AP) — Arthur Mitchell, who broke barriers for African-Americans in the 1950s as a ballet dancer with the New York City Ballet and who would go on to become a driving force in the creation of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, has died. He was 84.

Mitchell died Wednesday at a New York City hospital according to his niece, Juli Mills-Ross. She said the death came after renal failure led to heart failure.

Born in Harlem, Mitchell started dancing with the New York City Ballet in 1955 under famed choreographer George Balanchine.

Balanchine put him in several leading roles, including one pairing him with a white female dancer in “Agon” in 1957.

Read more

Continue Reading

Trending

Hey there!

Forgot password?

Don't have an account? Register

Forgot your password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Close
of

    Processing files…