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Want to Buy Instagram Followers? Here’s What Happens When You Do

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Everyone buys Instagram followers, it seems like.

In August 2019, the Institute of Contemporary Music Performance ran a long list of famous people through an Instagram audit, and it turns out that everyone from Ellen to Taylor to Ariana has an outrageous percentage of fake Instagram followers—49% fake, 46%, and 46%, respectively.

Granted, Ms. Swift is probably not buying those Instagram followers. There are plenty of bots who follow big name users to attract other (hopefully real) users—and make themselves look more legitimate (a 0 follower count is your #1 red flag). Instagram also usually suggests big names to new users, as it doesn’t yet know much about new users’ preferences.

But that doesn’t faze smaller brands or newer influencers like (spoiler alert) Caroline Calloway, who recently admitted to buying tens of thousands of followers back when she was just starting out. (Reader, I gasped.)

The idea that you must have a certain number of followers to be taken seriously—especially as you get your brand up and running—has been floating around for years. Vanity metrics are all about appearances, after all.

And we know how much work it takes to get real Instagram followers. Shortcuts can be tempting.

But we wanted to test this particular shortcut out for ourselves.

So I bought some Instagram followers for my niece, Rosie, who is a burgeoning dog influencer. (Ok, ok, I admit: this is actually just an account where I stalk my friend’s dog.)

Read full article at Hootsuite HERE @ https://blog.hootsuite.com/buy-instagram-followers-experiment/?utm_campaign=cust_selfserve-alwayson-engagement-glo-en—-engagement_prog31_nov19_buy_instagram_followers%E2%80%94q4_2019&utm_source=nurture&utm_medium=email&utm_content=&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTm1aallUSXlNbUUwTVdFNCIsInQiOiJRdEFtenBaMmk4VUd6WDRPUmg0WHd4VTBIbTd4dDlpd0lmWlNLZm5RcVpHZXdOYUZ2Sld3SWVaXC9xUlV0QUtmSkR4WlRDV1MxdlFiNXV4dStzcDJTWHFlUTFiOXBQeHV2c0Q2WFFUbyt0d2Z0NDhSaGs2N3lQSkJIZmwwR1RXdXYifQ%3D%3D

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Google’s Advertising Platform Is Blocking Articles About Racism

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On Martin Luther King Jr. Day this year, the Atlantic decided to recirculate King’s famous “Letter From Birmingham Jail,” which the magazine had run in its August 1963 issue and republished, in print and online, in 2018. Several hours later, the publication’s staff noticed that Google’s Ad Exchange platform, which serves many of the ads on the Atlantic’s website, had “demonetized” the page containing the letter under its “dangerous or derogatory content” policy. In other words: As part of its efforts to protect advertisers from offensive internet content with which they would not want their products to be associated, Ad Exchange had locked out one of the most important texts of the civil rights movement.

Google controls more than 30 percent of the digital ads market. A big chunk of that business happens through Ad Exchange, a marketplace for buying and selling advertising space across the web. According to its publisher policies, Google does not monetize, or allow advertising on, “dangerous or derogatory content” that disparages people on the basis of a characteristic that is associated with systemic discrimination—race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, etc. As the policy outlines, this might look like “promoting hate groups” or “encouraging others to believe that a person or group is inhuman.” Because of the scale of Google’s ad-serving business, however, it can’t enforce this policy on the front lines by hand, so instead the company uses an algorithm that, in part, scans for offensive keywords in articles. But the system doesn’t always take context into consideration. Several mainstream publishers, including Slate, have had articles demonetized under this policy when covering race and LGBTQ issues.

Read the entire article @ Slate.com

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